Job Search

Security Logistic Supply Environmental Operative Supply Builder WIC Airport Services Infrastructure

Terminal 5

center=51.480885,-0.468932&zoom=11

Project Value

£1b

Client: Balfour Beatty

Type: Airport

Opened in 2008, London Heathrow Terminal 5 is the largest free-standing structure in the UK. The glass and steel structure gives a great sense of space and significantly increases the building’s energy efficiency.

It can handle 30 million passengers per year, taking Heathrow’s total number of passengers to around 90 million thus making Heathrow the world’s business airport. The design of the new terminal began in 1989 but planning permission was only granted in 2001.  Construction began in September 2002 with earthworks for the construction of the building’s foundation. In November of the same year, work started on the steel superstructure of the main terminal building. By January 2005, the 9 tunnels needed to provide road and access, and to also provide drainage, was completed. In March of the same year, the 6th and final section of the main terminal roof was lifted into position with the building being made waterproof in December.  At peak there were around 8,000 people working on the construction site, whilst over the life of the project over 60,000 people have been involved.  

One of the most challenging aspects of the Terminal 5 project is the ‘box’; which forms the new underground station.  Close liaison was required by the Munnelly Logistics team with the principal contractor to ensure that a safe and efficient delivery of the project was achieved. The operations for this scheme differed greatly from any other site Munnellys had been involved in, with 50% of the logistics being part of lift operations. All material in and waste out of the ‘box’ was made possible by lifting operations, with the hoists being taken down as areas became complete. Fire management and health and safety also played a huge part of this operation.

The underground Munnelly Logistics team were all fire marshal trained and 30% of the team were first aid trained.  Munnelly training budget of £90,000 had already been surpassed with longevity of service being rewarded with forklift, lifting coordinator, CITB 5 day management, fire marshal, hoist driver, security, first aid and many more courses being put in place.  The average length of service of the team stood at 2 years and 1 month; a true indication for quality and continuity of service.